Native Boot

Oderus · 440

magorium

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Reply #15 on: May 06, 2020, 11:21:32 PM
that sounds tempting. i have a few 50gb partitions that are ext4 and empty. as long as i dont put sda1 or sda5 on the vm i'd be good. i will try it the other way first though! if that fails i may try installing to a partition through a vm.
Whatever you do in case going _that_ route, in case there is  data on the existing partitions: make sure you have a backup or that it is ok if the data gets lost, or in case you are confident choosing the correct partitions (from AROS side, using AROS tools, which can be tricky in case not familiar with those) make sure you have a backup of your grub install.


By default (activated by default) AROS writes a grub to the boot partition. And fwiw that is grub 2.0 (has been so for ages, and not as written in another thread which suggests that AROS is still using legacy grub). If you already have grub installed you can read the grub.cfg from the cd-rom and add that to your existing grub, using the right partition parameters.


Oh, and i almost forgot. Icaros/Aros (by default) expects an _empty_ partition for installation. Not a formatted one. If not mistaken then that can be manually overridden (but again seen from AROS perspective with regards to partition numbers). Be sure to read the Icaros manual on that topic.


Oderus

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Reply #16 on: May 07, 2020, 10:04:41 PM
Ok so after a lot of trial and error I managed to get an aros installer on a usb drive. it boots up fine. now the question is... how do I determine where to install aros to?? say I wanted to install to sda7 for example or sdb5



magorium

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Reply #17 on: May 07, 2020, 10:31:57 PM
It is impossible from this end of the keyboard to determine what layout AROS uses for your drive/partition-scheme.

Use HD-Toolbox to inspect your drives and partition layouts as AROS sees them. The program can perhaps work a bit counter-intuitive for a newcomer but it is possible to obtain lots of information from that tool (disks/partitions/bootblocks/filesystems/etc). Make sure not to alter anything by accident.

You could compare that layout f.e. with the one from linux/gparted in case things are still a bit unclear.


Oderus

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Reply #18 on: May 08, 2020, 12:01:19 AM
next problem... is there a way to setup wifi? and i went to hdtoolbox, but I saw no sata.device just ata and others but nothing under any of it except for usb. i will be out of luck if there is no sata.device since my hdd is sata



magorium

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Reply #19 on: May 08, 2020, 10:46:55 AM
next problem... is there a way to setup wifi?
Icaros Desktop User Manual Chapter 3.4 Configure the network

Your chances for your wireless chipset to be supported are unfortunately next to none as only a few chipsets are supported.

There are one or two wifi usb adapters/dongles (with a specific chipset) that work though, so that in case you can't live without wireless then that might be an option.

Supported chipsets at wikibook X86 wireless network adapters:  https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Aros/Platforms/x86_Network_support#Wireless_Network_Adapters

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and i went to hdtoolbox, but I saw no sata.device just ata and others but nothing under any of it except for usb. i will be out of luck if there is no sata.device since my hdd is sata
Why would you be out of luck if there isn't a sata.device ? Have you tried ahci.device ? Does your HD not turn up inside HD toolbox for you ?

Now that we have established that AROS is able to run on your machine, now the question becomes in what state (and if you can live with that. Judging by your questions, it doesn't seem you like to sacrifice ?).

See, that is why it is a good idea to make a full install to a usb-pendrive, and boot that at your HW, because then you can make such a descision in a more informed manner  :)

I did not had a look earlier at your specs (as minimal as they are), but wtf. Is that really a tripple core with a baseclock of 3ghz ? And with virtualisation support ?

Then why.... of why... are you even trying to run (Ic)aros natively ? You will have a much better experience running from a VM or hosted.

My reaction simply stems from the fact that the road you are taking now defies logic. If it is just meant for testing or for fun or proof a point then i can perhaps understand it. If you wish to have an actual experience then either invest in the hardware that is supported or run (ic)AROS inside a VM or hosted. Just saying  :)