Ideas for Aros Distributions

OlafS3 · 5639

aGGreSSor

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Reply #30 on: December 28, 2020, 08:58:13 PM
@Agressor
you are a little sarcastic, arenīt you?  ;)
Yep, a bit
This thread is for collecting ideas, not to decide about what is possible and in which time frame
I don’t understand why to pound water in a mortar.
It's known that AROS is developed by one developer. Well, ok, we can strain and measure four.
How many of them will take ideas (which are immature enough and do not take into account many factors) into work?
Zero.

Rescuing drowning people is the work of the drowning people themselves, excuse me for the moral.
The creation of the file you wrote about is the user level.
No developer is required for this.
An activist with analytic skill and knowledge of the hardware base is needed here.
When there is a clear algorithm and a regularly updated database, we can talk about programming.

If we made a free very user friendly 68k emulator it would for sure be a success.
Take and create. What's stopping? It's just a matter of time taken.
If you can spend a year discussing ideas, then you can spend a year developing a Janus-UAE2.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2020, 09:09:50 PM by aGGreSSor »



Johndoe

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Reply #31 on: December 29, 2020, 01:56:04 AM
Okay, here's an idea: non-Zune (GUI) distro but with any other desktop environment like KDE or MATE. I've read that AROS is POSIX compatible, so there probably shouldn't be any technical problems.



cdimauro

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Reply #32 on: December 29, 2020, 07:52:28 AM

1. imho it would be more productive if users just could use one of those many pen-drive tools that allows them to install a .iso to it and be able to boot from it. That i am able to abuses hosted for it, is one thing but i do not expect a noob to be able do that.


2. Other than that, i like the idea about checking configurations. Paolone already did such a thing by allowing people to report their (supported) hardware. Since i have never heard of it again (good or bad), i can only assume that was a dead-end ?
1. +1, but I may say +2, +100 or +1000. I can't count how many times I had to delude people who tried to turn Icaros ISOs into USB pendrives using uNetbootin, Rufus and similar tools. There is a quite simple procedure to create an AROS installation pendrive, and I even made it even simplier with the "Create USB installation pendrive" script in the root of Icaros DVDs, but giving the damn ISO to a Rufus-like tool would be faaaaaar simplier.
Indeed. And here come two suggestions:


1) AROS should allow to boot (at least) and use (much better) a FAT32 formatted partition. This will definitely solve the above problem, while also allowing to play with the USB Pen content (adding, changing, deleting stuff), making experiments, without the burden to either do it every time after the installation and/or using a FAT32 partition as a "bridge" to share some files to modify the SFS partition.


2) As a temporary solution to the above 1), provide an Icaros or AROS ISO that internally is SFS native, so that it can be immediately used after "burning" with Rufus et similia, without the burden of the complete installation process. As you already reported in your blog, nowadays we have PLENTY of resources: just use them! It's completely pointless and a waste of time trying to save some space by selecting what components/tools/applications install, when the full installation of Icaros takes just 6 or even 5 GB of total space.
So, the idea is: you "burn" the (NON-live!) ISO. Boot the USB Pen. And you have an already, fully prepared, Icaros/AROS installation. Then the only thing which is missing is configuring some user settings (language/locale, etc.), but this requires seconds, and then you can immediately use the installed o.s..
This will turn Icaros/AROS in a "quasi-live" distro.
Quote
2. It's still inside the guts of Icaros Desktop and I am quite sure it is still working today. It's a pity no one reads the documentation and every day people repeat the same questions like parrots.
I assume that you're talking about this:


"3.8 Sending bug reports to AROS and 3rd party software developers
[...]
Your PC specs -> open PCITool and save this information on RAM, then copy it somewhere"

Which is a completely different thing from the that specific part of the discussion, albeit PCITool might be a starting point on AROS side.




Quote
Just look to this thread, with people asking things Icaros is doing for a decade.
Maybe time for a quick FAQ with the relevant points? A 151 pages manual might be too much and discourage people, albeit it's a masterpiece since it has really all documentation/information needed.


With any hardware made last 10 years you will not have a supported network chip. You will neither have native gfx, VESA will work.

VESA support is another area of improvement. The available VESA modes might be queried and selected from inside AROS, instead of doing it from GRUB.

This requires an 8086 emulator to cheat the VGA BIOS and allowing to make the required calls to it, to achieve the goal.

in my view 68k integration is the most important feature for amiga user

It's already there with Amibridge, as paolone already reported. So, nothing is needed to already use it as you wish.

What can be improved is something like what I've suggested for the supported hardware configurations: a database (again: might be a simple CSV file) of 68K games and applications, reporting the needed 68K config (CPU used, chipset used, min/max amount of chip/slow/Zorro2/Zorro3/processor-card ram, if and how many floppy to be configured, if and how many and the capacity of physical hard drives, RTG card, audio card), the AROS config (clipboard sharing, networking sharing, hard drive sharing, etc.), and the Amibridge sharing (screen, window, coherence mode).

This way you can immediately use the 68K games and apps without any configuration needed. If the game or app is not yet added to the database, then the first user that is able to integrate it on Amibridge just sends its config (maybe from Amibridge) to the database maintainer, which updates it.

Okay, here's an idea: non-Zune (GUI) distro but with any other desktop environment like KDE or MATE. I've read that AROS is POSIX compatible, so there probably shouldn't be any technical problems.

AROS, and the Amiga o.s. in general, is not POSIX-compatible.



paolone

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Reply #33 on: December 29, 2020, 02:30:57 PM
2) As a temporary solution to the above 1), provide an Icaros or AROS ISO that internally is SFS native, so that it can be immediately used after "burning" with Rufus et similia, without the burden of the complete installation process. As you already reported in your blog, nowadays we have PLENTY of resources: just use them! It's completely pointless and a waste of time trying to save some space by selecting what components/tools/applications install, when the full installation of Icaros takes just 6 or even 5 GB of total space.
So, the idea is: you "burn" the (NON-live!) ISO. Boot the USB Pen. And you have an already, fully prepared, Icaros/AROS installation. Then the only thing which is missing is configuring some user settings (language/locale, etc.), but this requires seconds, and then you can immediately use the installed o.s..
This will turn Icaros/AROS in a "quasi-live" distro.


That's a fuckin' great idea! I just don't know how to create such a ISO file from a SFS partition. AROS hasn't a suitable filesystem, able to handle 4GB+ large files, and I guess I could create a VM, install Icaros on it, attach the .vmdk file to a Linux machine, and then use some tool there. But... what? and how?


aGGreSSor

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Reply #34 on: December 29, 2020, 03:27:05 PM
AROS, and the Amiga o.s. in general, is not POSIX-compatible.
AROS and AmigaOS 4 almost POSIX compliant.
Linux does not have full POSIX compatibility either (doesn't need it, has LSB - Linux Standard Base).
KDE isn't related to POSIX. Johndoe was just joking.
I liked it for a great joke.  ;D


Mazze

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Reply #35 on: December 29, 2020, 06:43:39 PM
If you look at the bottom of
https://aros.sourceforge.io/pictures/screenshots/
you'll see 2 screenshots from 1997 when AROS was using with X11 windows :-)



aGGreSSor

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Reply #36 on: December 29, 2020, 08:58:34 PM
If you look at the bottom of
https://aros.sourceforge.io/pictures/screenshots/
you'll see 2 screenshots from 1997 when AROS was using with X11 windows :-)
I decided (perhaps foolishly) to install a Docker Desktop with WLS2.
It totally slows down AROS that is launched in Virtualbox: all rendering becomes frame-by-frame.
And long ears become visible X11. In normal operation this happens very quickly and the user doesn't see it.
But this extra redrawing happens all the time. It's necessary to record a video as AROS slows down. :D

No sooner said than done. Demonstration of very slow AROS:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmnf5lECH4Q
« Last Edit: December 29, 2020, 09:17:13 PM by aGGreSSor »



cdimauro

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Reply #37 on: December 29, 2020, 10:13:38 PM
2) As a temporary solution to the above 1), provide an Icaros or AROS ISO that internally is SFS native, so that it can be immediately used after "burning" with Rufus et similia, without the burden of the complete installation process. As you already reported in your blog, nowadays we have PLENTY of resources: just use them! It's completely pointless and a waste of time trying to save some space by selecting what components/tools/applications install, when the full installation of Icaros takes just 6 or even 5 GB of total space.
So, the idea is: you "burn" the (NON-live!) ISO. Boot the USB Pen. And you have an already, fully prepared, Icaros/AROS installation. Then the only thing which is missing is configuring some user settings (language/locale, etc.), but this requires seconds, and then you can immediately use the installed o.s..
This will turn Icaros/AROS in a "quasi-live" distro.

That's a fuckin' great idea! I just don't know how to create such a ISO file from a SFS partition. AROS hasn't a suitable filesystem, able to handle 4GB+ large files, and I guess I could create a VM, install Icaros on it, attach the .vmdk file to a Linux machine, and then use some tool there. But... what? and how?
I'm using Windows, so I don't know how to do it with my machine.


But AFAIK Linux supports SFS, so it should be enough to do what you already reported (the .vmdk file will be the 5-6GB SFS "disk" where you installed Icaros), and after that use a dd command to make a raw dump of the complete SFS disk to a single file. This file should be the one to be flashed to the USB Pen.


Flashing this file to an USB Pen then should take a only a few seconds, since it's a verbatim copy directly writing the data to the USB Pen's sectors (you don't have to copy thousands of small files that takes ages with the current process, and it's also error prone, as you already know).


I hope that this helps and... works! :)


AROS, and the Amiga o.s. in general, is not POSIX-compatible.
AROS and AmigaOS 4 almost POSIX compliant. Linux does not have full POSIX compatibility either (doesn't need it, has LSB - Linux Standard Base).KDE isn't related to POSIX. Johndoe was just joking. I liked it for a great joke.  ;D

Yes, I know that Linux isn't fully POSIX-compliant. :)

However at least it has the fork() API, which is missing on AROS and any other Amiga o.s./-like system. That's the major problem when porting apps from the Unix/POSIX/Linux worlds to one of those amigaoid platforms. :-/



Johndoe

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Reply #38 on: December 30, 2020, 04:44:58 AM
AROS, and the Amiga o.s. in general, is not POSIX-compatible.
AROS and AmigaOS 4 almost POSIX compliant.
Linux does not have full POSIX compatibility either (doesn't need it, has LSB - Linux Standard Base).
KDE isn't related to POSIX. Johndoe was just joking.
I liked it for a great joke.  ;D

Okay, forget about Posix. Anyway, does the idea of replacing the Zune with another DE seem interesting to you?
How difficult is it technically to implement? How interesting is this idea to developers? Or maybe your community doesn't accept anything other than vanilla Zuna?
It seems to me that creating distributions using alternative DE will attract new people, which will be beneficial.



aGGreSSor

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Reply #39 on: December 30, 2020, 08:10:07 AM
I'm using Windows, so I don't know how to do it with my machine.
It explains everything

But AFAIK Linux supports SFS
Where do you get this nonsense?
1) Linux is kernel. 2) No, only support for affs (Amiga Fast File System) can be compiled into Linux kernels, and offers full read, write and format support on FFS and OFS partitions of all dostypes except DOS\6 and DOS\7 (which are probably incredibly rare).

I hope that this helps and... works! :)
Why do you write something that you don't know and haven't tested?

Yes, I know that Linux isn't fully POSIX-compliant. :)
When you write about compatibility with POSIX and aren't joking, write the standard of what year you mean.
In fact, Linux just doesn't have a POSIX certificate and, for example, MacOS X has UNIX 03 certificate. Even Windows NT has a POSIX certificate, and got it before Solaris. It's a matter of the money paid for the certificate. Open source platforms won't pay money. Amiga won't pay money. If you try to make some programming for Mac, you will see that lot of UNIX functions or their modes are missing in MacOS X, while these functions and modes are available on Linux, modern BSD or commercial UNIX such AIX. So don't write nonsense about POSIX.

However at least it has the fork() API, which is missing on AROS and any other Amiga o.s./-like system. That's the major problem when porting apps from the Unix/POSIX/Linux worlds to one of those amigaoid platforms. :-/
Fork() is one of 100,500+ cross-compilation problems and not the first in importance. If you are talking about POSIX, then the modern standard is POSIX threads (pthreads). I give you a link for free: POSIX Threads for AROS and MorphOS. fork() call in most cases is replaced by stubs, wrappers and emulations, even on Linux projects, for example, in SDL.

Okay, forget about Posix. Anyway, does the idea of replacing the Zune with another DE seem interesting to you?
Tell me where you saw in AmigaOS something similar to display manager in X11/XOrg like xdm, gdm, kdm and 100500+ dm? Gnome and KDE apps can be ported to AmigaOS 4, MorphOS and AROS. At the same time, they will terribly slow down, but in principle, this has already been done more than once. The appearance of windows in KDE doesn't matter, Zune has much more control over application windows.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2020, 08:31:25 AM by aGGreSSor »



cdimauro

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Reply #40 on: December 30, 2020, 08:51:39 AM
I'm using Windows, so I don't know how to do it with my machine.
It explains everything
Where did you saw that I don't know Linux?
Quote
But AFAIK Linux supports SFS
Where do you get this nonsense?
1) Linux is kernel.
Really? What an incredible "new" you gave me...
Quote
2) No, only support for affs (Amiga Fast File System) can be compiled into Linux kernels, and offers full read, write and format support on FFS and OFS partitions of all dostypes except DOS\6 and DOS\7 (which are probably incredibly rare).
After a simple search: https://github.com/nosway/sfs
Quote
I hope that this helps and... works! :)
Why do you write something that you don't know and haven't tested?
Because... I can? Do you know that this thread about ideas? Do you understand the topic of thread before start writing on it?

And just to clarify: I'm pretty sure that the dd command will work out, since I've used it some times at work for dumping or restoring entire partitions.

BTW, probably the SFS support isn't needed if paolone just installs Icaros on a raw disk with VMWare. I mean: if it doesn't require to work on that partition from Linux.
Quote
Yes, I know that Linux isn't fully POSIX-compliant. :)
When you write about compatibility with POSIX and aren't joking, write the standard of what year you mean.
In fact, Linux just doesn't have a POSIX certificate and, for example, MacOS X has UNIX 03 certificate. Even Windows NT has a POSIX certificate, and got it before Solaris. It's a matter of the money paid for the certificate. Open source platforms won't pay money. Amiga won't pay money. If you try to make some programming for Mac, you will see that lot of UNIX functions or their modes are missing in MacOS X, while these functions and modes are available on Linux, modern BSD or commercial UNIX such AIX. So don't write nonsense about POSIX.
I never have written non-sense about POSIX: this is only in your imagination.
Quote
However at least it has the fork() API, which is missing on AROS and any other Amiga o.s./-like system. That's the major problem when porting apps from the Unix/POSIX/Linux worlds to one of those amigaoid platforms. :-/
Fork() is one of 100,500+ cross-compilation problems and not the first in importance. If you are talking about POSIX, then the modern standard is POSIX threads (pthreads). I give you a link for free: POSIX Threads for AROS and MorphOS. fork() call in most cases is replaced by stubs, wrappers and emulations, even on Linux projects, for example, in SDL.
First, fork is one of the most used APIs in the Unix world.

Second, pthreads are an horrible patch over the consolidated process model in the Unix world.

Third, since fork is used a lot in the Unix world, you need to rewrite the existing code trying to see if there can be another API or workaround. This requires time, and not even the guarantee to succeed (otherwise a lot more applications would already be ported to AROS or other o.sed.).

Now let's see how long you need to continue trolling to satisfy your ego...



aGGreSSor

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Reply #41 on: December 30, 2020, 10:27:16 AM
Where did you saw that I don't know Linux?
At least you are making far-reaching conclusions about the Linux ecosystem for no apparent reason.

After a simple search: https://github.com/nosway/sfs
So what? You really don't see the difference between: "Linux supports SFS" and "I found on github"?

First, fork is one of the most used APIs in the Unix world.
First, statements must be confirmed. Why do you think so? fork() was written in 1962! I actually don't see a fork of 99 out of 100 modern apps. Its implementation is hidden or replaced by another. What are you going to transfer that you are so annoyed with the fork?

Second, pthreads are an horrible patch over the consolidated process model in the Unix world.
Again, it isn't clear what this is based on. pthreads needed when porting often, e.g. for networked multithreaded applications. The link to one of the realizations that I personally use was given above.

you need to rewrite the existing code trying to see if there can be another API or workaround.
Yes! When I port something I constantly rewrite implementations or borrow ready-made ones that have already been rewritten. I don't see a fork, but this is one of the 100500+ problems that can occur. The directive will be individually set and changed to vfork() or pthread_create() or another.
These are private things that simply accompany any porting, and not a universal disaster.

This requires time, and not even the guarantee to succeed (otherwise a lot more applications would already be ported to AROS or other o.sed.).
Up to 90% of all AROS applications are ported or adapted from *nix. The only reason why large projects aren't ported is that there are no people willing to spend time on this and also there are no people willing to learn, but there are plenty of theoreticians.

Do you understand the topic of thread before start writing on it?
Do you understand the difference between an idea and an unscientific fiction?


cdimauro

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Reply #42 on: December 30, 2020, 11:43:32 AM
Where did you saw that I don't know Linux?
At least you are making far-reaching conclusions about the Linux ecosystem for no apparent reason.
You're making wrong assumptions, as usual, since you don't understand what people is writing, and therefore you reply with non-sense.

Unless you're affected by functional illiteracy (which requires actions on your side), you should first understand what was written, and only AFTER that write something (IF needed, and makes sense, of course).

Specifically, you've assumed that I didn't know Linux only because I cannot check something on my machine because it has Windows.

Have you understood your logical fallacy now, or should I draw a chart?
Quote
After a simple search: https://github.com/nosway/sfs
So what? You really don't see the difference between: "Linux supports SFS" and "I found on github"?
No. The goal is to read/write SFS on Linux, and whether it comes from from the master or from an external repository is irrelevant.
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First, fork is one of the most used APIs in the Unix world.
First, statements must be confirmed. Why do you think so? fork() was written in 1962!
Who cares when it was written.
Quote
I actually don't see a fork of 99 out of 100 modern apps.
What you see or not is totally irrelevant, and at least it shows how limited is your vision and experience.

Here's an example which I've found with a quick search:
https://src.chromium.org/viewvc/chrome/trunk/src/base/process_util_posix.cc?pathrev=58558
Code: [Select]
pid_t pid = fork();
331   switch (pid) {
Chromium is a MODERN application (read: not from 1962) and it's clearly visible that it's using fork().
Quote
Its implementation is hidden
If it's hidden it means that it's still there, elementary logic at hands, and so the problem remains...
Quote
or replaced by another.
Same as above: irrelevant. It only proves that you're a noob in the Unix world.
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What are you going to transfer that you are so annoyed with the fork?
Maybe because I know how AROS and an Amiga/like o.s. works, and that fork is a black beast for them?

So, you're a noob in the Amiga world as well.
Quote
Second, pthreads are an horrible patch over the consolidated process model in the Unix world.
Again, it isn't clear what this is based on. pthreads needed when porting often, e.g. for networked multithreaded applications. The link to one of the realizations that I personally use was given above.
And so? Then try to remove fork() from Chromium and give a modern browser (which is really needed. Current ones are outdated) to AROS, using pthreads instead.

Enjoy...
Quote
you need to rewrite the existing code trying to see if there can be another API or workaround.
Yes! When I port something I constantly rewrite implementations or borrow ready-made ones that have already been rewritten. I don't see a fork, but this is one of the 100500+ problems that can occur. The directive will be individually set and changed to vfork() or pthread_create() or another.
These are private things that simply accompany any porting, and not a universal disaster.
And so? Have I ever stated that fork is the only problem when porting apps (to the Amiga land)?

You continue to don't understand what people has written, making wrong assumptions, and falling in logical fallacies...
Quote
This requires time, and not even the guarantee to succeed (otherwise a lot more applications would already be ported to AROS or other o.sed.).
Up to 90% of all AROS applications are ported or adapted from *nix.
And so? This mean nothing. Many many others are missing, even very useful ones, and you don't know if porting some of them is easy like the above 90% ones.
Quote
The only reason why large projects aren't ported is that there are no people willing to spend time on this and also there are no people willing to learn,
Wrong. Take a look at the recent browser for MorphOS, which was written (porting Chromium, AFAIR) by a SINGLE person, and it's being continuously and frequently updated. Don't tell me that it's an easy task. But it was made by ONE person.
Quote
but there are plenty of theoreticians.
Clap clap clap. You made the dig of the day. What's next?

And at least theoreticians have knowledge, which is clearly missing to you, which don't know neither Unix nor the Amiga/AROS worlds.
Quote
Do you understand the topic of thread before start writing on it?
Do you understand the difference between an idea and an unscientific fiction?
Unscientific fiction? Like this one that you've written:
"Attach the file hardware_database.csv to your next post. I suggest you keep it up to date.
We will write the application somehow: we will rely on your file."

?

Which shows that you don't even have a clue about how problems should be solved. And you're supposed to be a coder, from what you've written 'til now. But with almost zero problem solving mindset, as it was shown by your non-sense proposal that you've written me.

So, yes, your statement can be clearly classified ad sci-fi in the programming world.

But my ideas are not, on the exact contrary, because they are practical solutions to real problems, which only need to be implemented, since they are technical feasible.

And if you don't understand this and continue to talk about "unscientific fiction", it only shows how limited are you on both technical knowledge and coding skills.

So, go learn something because you've deep gaps to be filled, instead of tickle people which, on the contrary, knows very well what he speaks about...
« Last Edit: December 30, 2020, 11:47:35 AM by cdimauro »



aGGreSSor

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Reply #43 on: December 30, 2020, 02:31:32 PM
@cdimauro
You wrote a lot of nonsense and got personal. I will not answer you point by point.
I will answer in essence. Chromium is just one application for platforms that have a fork() call.
In fact, I will give you a hint: pthread_create also uses fork().
It makes sense to make a fork() call on those platforms that have it.
On the Amiga it doesn't make sense, so the implementation changes.
However, your source code may still contain fork(), pthread_create(), anything else
This is not a problem if appropriate wrappers have been written.
aminet, os4depot, aros-exec.org has a bunch of applications and modern games ported from Linux and not using the fork () call
Well, there are ~150 of mine, of course, this isn't enough to judge.  ;)

Quote
"Attach the file hardware_database.csv to your next post. I suggest you keep it up to date.
We will write the application somehow: we will rely on your file."
Why do you undertake to propose if you cannot do such a simple thing? are you waiting for someone else to do it? Who?

« Last Edit: December 30, 2020, 02:41:45 PM by aGGreSSor »



OlafS3

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Reply #44 on: December 30, 2020, 03:32:54 PM
@cdimauro
You wrote a lot of nonsense and got personal. I will not answer you point by point.
I will answer in essence. Chromium is just one application for platforms that have a fork() call.
In fact, I will give you a hint: pthread_create also uses fork().
It makes sense to make a fork() call on those platforms that have it.
On the Amiga it doesn't make sense, so the implementation changes.
However, your source code may still contain fork(), pthread_create(), anything else
This is not a problem if appropriate wrappers have been written.
aminet, os4depot, aros-exec.org has a bunch of applications and modern games ported from Linux and not using the fork () call
Well, there are ~150 of mine, of course, this isn't enough to judge.  ;)

Quote
"Attach the file hardware_database.csv to your next post. I suggest you keep it up to date.
We will write the application somehow: we will rely on your file."
Why do you undertake to propose if you cannot do such a simple thing? are you waiting for someone else to do it? Who?

I would say from what I sometimes read that Aros earns it to be called "research" and not taken seriously. The difference between MorphOS team and the Aros devs is that the team feels responsible for the "package". User do not know or care who is responsible for what part, they want something they can easily install, works stable and offers what they expect... in Aros world devs do not care about that, Kal openly said that. And even your comments sound a little like that. That is different what I see around Vampire and Aros 68k, the interest there is to have something people like to use and not just some fiddling around by some devs who do what they just like (and drop it if they are no longer interested). That is a basic difference and one of the biggest weaknesses of Aros. I f.e. do some windows programming. There might be a chance to create a software that detects hardware but it makes no sense to invest time without the needed informations about the components (what is supported and what is not). And the devs say it is not their responsibility. So it will not happen. People will try to install and fail and then spread in forums what a shit aros is. And devs will moan that people not support their great work...

To me the discussions demonstrate why aros never was really accepted in the community... at least on 68k I can solve many problems with 68k components. One of the basic problems is, what devs are interested in is not necessarily what potential users are interested in. It is more interesting to work on "USB3" (as example) than bugfix wanderer. or other components. The other problem is driver support. But for that the few distribution maintainers left and the aros devs /X86 related) should agree on a common concept or goal and hardware aros targets. As long this not happens I do not see Aros really progressing. Latest after ISA switch of MorphOS (propably AMD64) Aros will look pretty old. It had a huge advantage of many years compared to other amiga related platforms but not used it. There is a chance that it further lives on 68k and even makes progress there, on X86 (or AMD64) it will propably fail. And that has much to do with attitudes of the aros devs (unfortunately). Those problems cannot be solved by just distribution creators. It must be solved in cooperation between devs and maintainers. If this not happen it will fail., Or better... Aros on X86/AMD64 will stay "research" and become obsolet finally
« Last Edit: December 30, 2020, 03:56:00 PM by OlafS3 »