AROS x86_64-smp Network Support under VMWare

ferrellsl · 272

ferrellsl

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Reply #15 on: June 01, 2022, 06:35:13 PM
I downloaded the latest nightly build for AROS x86_64 SMP (May 31) and was pleasantly surprised to find that it boots and installs just fine in VMware using the VMware video driver and AROS Native GFX. Audio is also working as is SMP support. I can see all CPUs with SysMon.

I'm trying to get the PCNet32 driver working with VMware and was wondering if the driver is currently functional or not. I've tried various static IP settings as well as DHCP without any success. If anyone has any insight as to how to get networking functioning under VMware I'd be grateful. I'm using VMware's NAT adapter.


In the initial VM setup menu, what OS had you suggested you were going to install? VMware creates a different virtual machine based on your indication.


For 32bit AROS, the best option is "MS/DOS", but for 64 bit I sincerely don't remember.

I created the machine as "64-bit other" and it boots amazingly fast in about 6 seconds.  I can change the machine type to MS-DOS, but the boot time increases to about 2 minutes and the networking problems remains.

AROS One boots just as expected since it's a Linux hosted OS as do the other 15 operating systems that I have running under VMWare.  My VMs range from MS-DOS, FreeDOS, Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows 2000, Windows XP (32 & 64 bit), Windows 8, Windows 10, Windows 11, OS X, Ubuntu 17 and Ubuntu 20. All work properly except the AROS x86_64 SMP build.

« Last Edit: June 01, 2022, 06:56:16 PM by ferrellsl »



AMIGASYSTEM

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Reply #16 on: June 01, 2022, 07:11:44 PM
Thanks for trying my AROS One, actually the "MS-DOS" choice is slow even on AROS One, much faster especially the network if you configure Other/Other, but even if you choose Windows7 it is fast AROS One, among other things it enables you the entry to install VMware-Tools


ferrellsl

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Reply #17 on: June 01, 2022, 09:58:24 PM
Thanks for trying my AROS One, actually the "MS-DOS" choice is slow even on AROS One, much faster especially the network if you configure Other/Other, but even if you choose Windows7 it is fast AROS One, among other things it enables you the entry to install VMware-Tools

I'm not particularly interested in the hosted versions of AROS because it's Linux under the hood with an API translation layer or shim handling the Amiga system calls.  I'm interested in AROS x86_64 SMP because it ISN'T Linux under the hood.  I understand why some users and developers prefer Linux hosted, because it's easier to set up, supports more hardware and is more stable than native AROS.  But I already use several flavors of Linux for various projects and if I wanted to use another Linux distro I'd just download one of the tried and tested versions of Ubuntu, Slax, Red Hat, etc....

It would be the same situation if BeOS was hosted on Linux.  I think most users who are interested in BeOS would stay away from a Linux hosted version because they're not interested in running Linux with different window dressings on top.

I also need a 64-bit address space because I work with files larger than 4GB and I also want SMP because I can't see the point of hobbling my multi-core CPU with an OS that only uses one core.  So 32 bit versions of any OS are out of the question for me.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2022, 10:03:08 PM by ferrellsl »



AMIGASYSTEM

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Reply #18 on: June 01, 2022, 10:09:20 PM

I'm not particularly interested in the hosted versions of AROS because it's Linux under the hood with an API translation layer or shim handling the Amiga system calls.  I'm interested in AROS x86_64 SMP because it ISN'T Linux under the hood.  I understand why some users and developers prefer Linux hosted, because it's easier to set up, supports more hardware and is more stable than native AROS.  But I already use several flavors of Linux for various projects and if I wanted to use another Linux distro I'd just download one of the tried and tested versions of Ubuntu, Slax, Red Hat, etc....


I agree with you, I also don't like host systems, each Os has to walk on its own feet, this olre to push the growth of the system entertains much more